Alexa

Building an assistant on an assistant with Nick Carey

Building an assistant on an assistant with Nick Carey 1800 1200 VUX World

This week, Dustin Coates and Kane Simms are joined by Nick Carey of Potato to discuss the concept of creating an assistant on an assistant. read more

Talk to me with James Vlahos

Talk to me with James Vlahos 1800 1200 VUX World

This week, Dustin and I are joined by journalist and author, James Vlahos, to discuss the details of his book Talk to Me: How voice computing will transform the way we live, work and think. read more

A voice design workshop blueprint for Alexa skill building

A voice design workshop blueprint for Alexa skill building 1800 1200 VUX World

Voice design can be a challenge for those who’ve never done it. Designing an Alexa skill is completely different to designing a website or app.

In this video, we run through a blueprint for a voice design workshop that you can use with your team or clients to find a use case, design, prototype and test a voice app. read more

Designing story-telling robots with Amy Stapleton

Designing story-telling robots with Amy Stapleton 1800 1200 VUX World

This week, Dustin and I are joined by Tellables co-founder, Amy Stapleton, to discuss storytelling through Alexa and the design challenges that come with that.

By the end of this podcast, you’ll:

  • Be familiar with situational design
  • Gain insight into designing with Amazon Polly
  • Learn about complex interaction models
  • See how you can use metaphors to help users navigate (in this case, a box of chocolates)
  • Understand how to build your own voice CMS and more

About Amy and Tellables

After spending many years in IT, including 14 years at NASA as an IT manager, Amy Stapleton is driving the voice first revolution forward. Tellables build conversational story experiences for talking devices and provide a platform to showcase the work of talented authors within voice apps.

Where to listen

Apple podcasts

Spotify

YouTube

CastBox

Spreaker

TuneIn

Breaker

Stitcher

PlayerFM

iHeartRadio

Links

Visit the Tellables website
Follow Tellables on Twitter
Follow Amy on Twitter
Enable My Box of Chocolates
View the My Box of Chocolates list of candies
Enable the Tricky Genie skill
Check out the Pepper robot
Find out more about Airtable
Paul Cutsinger on situational design

All about voice content management and localisation with Milkana Brace and Jonathan Burstein

All about voice content management and localisation with Milkana Brace and Jonathan Burstein 1800 1200 VUX World


Today, we’re discussing why you should separate voice app content from your code and logic with Jargon founders, Milkana Brace (CEO) and Jonathan Burstein (CTO). read more

VUI design best practice for kids skills with the BBC’s Paul Jackson

VUI design best practice for kids skills with the BBC’s Paul Jackson 1800 1200 VUX World

We’re honoured to be joined by Paul Jackson, Senior Designer at the BBC, to discuss how the Beeb are approaching VUI design, with a particular focus on designing Alexa Skills for kids. read more

How to design a voice experience for the older generation with Heidi Culbertson

How to design a voice experience for the older generation with Heidi Culbertson 1800 1200 VUX World

This week, Dustin Coates and I are joined by Ask Marvee founder and CEO, Heidi Culbertson, to discuss VUX design for the older generation. read more

The Rundown 002: Alexa’s new hardware and dev tools, Google Home Mini becomes top selling smart speaker and more

The Rundown 002: Alexa’s new hardware and dev tools, Google Home Mini becomes top selling smart speaker and more 1800 1200 VUX World

It’s been a busy few weeks with both of the top two voice assistant platforms announcing new devices and software improvements, but what does it all mean for brands, designers and developers?

Google Home Mini becomes top selling smart speaker

That’s right, the Google Home Mini smart speaker outsold all other smart speakers in Q2.

Google’s intense advertising over the summer months looks like it could be starting to pay off. It still isn’t the market leader. Amazon still holds that spot, for now.

Takeaway:

At the beginning of this year, Google Assistant was a nice-to-have feature in your voice strategy. Google’s progress over the summer and the recent sales of the Google Home Mini now mean that obtaining a presence on Google Assistant is unavoidable for brands looking to make serious play in this space.

We discuss whether you should use a tool like Jovo for developing cross-platform voice experiences or whether you should build natively.

Dustin’s pro tip:

If you need access to new feature updates as and when they’re released, you should build natively. If you’re happy to wait, use something like Jovo.

Google rumoured to be launching the Google Home Hub

It’s rumoured that Google will be releasing a smart display to rival the Amazon Echo Show.

In the podcast, we said that this will go on sale in October. That’s not the case. The actual sale date hasn’t been announced yet.

Takeaway:

With more voice assistants bringing screens into the equation, designing and developing multi modal experiences is going to be an increasing area of opportunity over the next year.

Google becomes multi-lingual

Google announced multi-lingual support for Google Assistant. That means that you can speak to the Assistant in a different language and have it respond back to you in that language without having to change the language settings. This is a great feature for households that speak more than one language.

Takeaway:

Although this might not be widely used initially, this is a great step forward in providing a frictionless user experience for those who speak more than one language. For brands, this brings the necessity to internationalise your voice experiences closer to home.

Check out the podcast we did with Maaike Dufour to learn more about how to transcreate and internationalise your voice experience.

Amazon announces about a million Alexa devices

Amazon announced a whole host of Alexa enabled devices last week, including:

  • Echo Dot V2 and Echo Plus V2
  • A new Echo Show (with a 10 inch screen)
  • Echo Auto (for the car)
  • Echo Sub (a subwoofer)
  • Fire TV Recast (a TV set top box)
  • An Alexa-injected microwave
  • A clock, with Alexa built in
  • Echo Input (turns any speaker into a smart speaker)
  • A Ring security camera
  • A smart plug
  • An amp

Takeaway:

These new devices, whether they succeed or fail, present opportunities for brands, designers and developers in that they provide an insight into a user’s context. That can help you shape an experience based around that context.

For example, you can now target commuters with long form audio through Alexa while they’re driving. You can provide micro engagement through Alexa while your customer is cooking their rice.

This could be the beginnings of the ‘Alexa Everywhere’ movement, which will be laden with opportunities for those who seek to understand where users are and what they’re seeking to achieve at that time.

Alexa Presentation Language

The Alexa Presentation Language allows you to design and develop custom visuals to enhance your user’s screen-accompanying Alexa experience.

Until now, if you wanted to serve visuals on an Echo Spot or Echo Show, you’d have to use one of 7 design templates. This announcement means that you can create your own designs and even do things like sync visual transitions with audio and, in future, there’ll be support for video and HTML 5.

Takeaway:

As with many of the items in this week’s Rundown, there’s an increasing emphasis on multi-modal experiences. Over the next year or so, expect more voice + screen devices. This will mean that you’ll need to start thinking about how you can add value through visuals as part of your offering.

Kane’s pro tip:

Even though there are more options for voice + screen, still focus on creating voice-first experiences. Don’t let the screen take over. Lead with voice and supplement or enhance with visuals.

Alexa smart screen and TV device SDK

This announcement enables device manufacturers to create hardware with a screen that runs Alexa. For example, Amazon will announce the details of how Sony have used the SDK to add Alexa capability to their TVs.

Takeaway:

For hardware brands, you can now add Alexa to your products. For the rest of us, watch this space. This is yet further evidence to suggest that voice + screen experiences are going to be something users come to expect in future.

Introducing the Alexa Connect Kit (ACK)

ACK allows device manufacturers to add Alexa to their hardware without having to worry about creating a skill or managing cloud services or security.

Essentially, you can add an ACK module to your device, connect it to your micro controller and hey presto, you have an Alexa enabled device.

It’s the same thing Amazon used to build their new microwave.

Takeaway:

Another opportunity for hardware brands to add value to your product line and another signal that Alexa will potentially be spreading further and wider. If you haven’t thought about how this might impact your business and the opportunities you might find in future, this is a good time to start that thought process.

Two final Alexa announcements:

Whisper mode, which enables a user to whisper at Alexa and it’ll whisper back.

Hunch, which is Alexa’s first move to become proactive in suggesting things you might want to do based on previous behaviour.

Takeaway:

In unclear whether either of these things require developers to markup their skills for this in any way or whether Alexa will take care of everything for you.

Finally, Bixby

Bixby will be opening up for public Beta in November after a few months in private beta.

There was a webinar this week, exclusive to the private beta members, which included a host of announcements. I’m still trying to get hold of the webinar or someone who can shed some light on it and we’ll try and bring you further news on this on the next Rundown.

The Rundown 001: Alexa settings API, 5 Google Assistant tips and more

The Rundown 001: Alexa settings API, 5 Google Assistant tips and more 1800 1200 VUX World

We’re starting a new feature on VUX World: The Rundown. Dustin Coates and I are getting together each week (or bi-weekly) to discuss the recent happenings in the voice space and how that’ll impact designers, developers and brands.

Alexa settings API

We’re starting off by discussing the Amazon Alexa feature that developers have been clambering for since 2016: the settings API.

With the settings API, you can access the user’s timezone (among other things) and use that within your skill to personalise the voice experience for your users. You can send them targeted push notifications at the appropriate time and use their preferred weather measurement (Celsius or Fahrenheit).

We discuss Eric Olsen’s (3PO Labs) in-depth review of the settings API and how it could be the beginning of something bigger.

Scott Huffman’s 5 insights on voice tech

We also discuss Scott Huffman’s post (VP Engineering, Google Assistant) on the five insights on voice technology and how they should impact your approach. For example, focusing on utilities and understanding what kind of things people use Assistant for at different times of day.

Voysis and Voicebot vCommerce study

We delve into the Voysis and Voicebot study on vCommerce and discuss how voice on mobile is so important, yet how it’s bubbling away under the surface, not grabbing many headlines.

Alexa skills challenge, Storyline and icon creation

Finally, we discuss the latest Alexa Skills Challenge: Games, in-skill purchases on Storyline (check out VUX World with Vasili Shynkarenka, CEO, Storyline) and the new Alexa feature that allows anyone to create icons for their skills.

Where to listen

Apple podcasts

Spotify

YouTube

CastBox

Spreaker

TuneIn

Breaker

Stitcher

PlayerFM

iHeartRadio

Other links

The Power of Habit book

Hooked book

All about Voiceitt with Sara Smolley

All about Voiceitt with Sara Smolley 1800 1200 VUX World

Alexa Accelerator 2018 featured startup, Voiceitt, gives people with speech impairments their voice back. Today, we’re joined by co-founder and VP Strategy, Sara Smolley, to hear all about it.

The There are millions of people across the globe who have non-standard speech. People who’ve had a stroke or who have multiple sclerosis or cerebral pausey, for example. Voiceitt’s advanced speech recognition system, which is deployed through an app, allows those people to speak and be understood.

Once it’s configured, all you do is speak through the app and Voiceitt will do the rest, handling speech to text and displaying the text on-screen whilst a synthetic voice speaks the words to you.

For all that’s said about voice being accessible, Voiceitt’s mission is to open up voice technology to the rest of the world.

Our Guest

After working in Hong Kong and South Korea in marketing and startup consulting, Sara moved to Tel Aviv to help build and establish Voiceitt. Sara travels across the globe working on the strategic side of the business, building relationships, gathering insights and bringing the powerful mission and technology that Voiceitt posses to the world.

Where to listen

Apple podcasts

Spotify

YouTube

CastBox

Spreaker

TuneIn

Breaker

Stitcher

PlayerFM

iHeartRadio

Links

http://www.voiceitt.com