design

The future is multi modal

The future is multi modal 1144 762 VUX World

Transcript

A good digital assistant will take context into consideration when providing a user experience.

Now that context can be related to the device that you’re using, could be related to the environment that you’re in, could be related to how much time and attention you have available at any given time.

So for example, if I’m in the kitchen washing up, I might have a bit of time but you might not have my attention and so the experience might need to be different to if I’m sitting in the front room watching the TV, where I do have time and I do have attention or if I’m out for a run wearing headphones and I don’t have either and so in the headphone example, maybe your interactions need to be really short and sharp and transient. In the living room example maybe you use visuals a little bit more and you lean on visuals more and in the kitchen, maybe you use audio first and you try and emphasize using earcons and things like that to make more of an audible experience.

Now, those are just real high-level examples and it’s difficult enough to create one conversation that’s intuitive. That’s natural. That’s easy to use.

Now think about doing that for all of these different devices and think about doing that not just for one third party app that you create but if you are the designers behind Google Assistant, it exists on over a billion devices, in over 90 countries and 30 different languages.

How do you create conversations that, yes, adapt to the different devices that you create as Google, but also the any number of devices that could be created by third-party manufacturers putting Google Assistant in their own hardware.

That is a very complex, very big task but it has to be the task for someone, and that someone is Daniel Padgett, Head of Conversation Design at Google.

He and his team work on creating consistent conversations across modalities for Google Assistant and we had the opportunity to interview Daniel and chat multi modal design for Google Assistant on the VUX World podcast this week.

We talked to Daniel about just how you go about creating genuine multimodal conversations that change depending on the device and context the user is in and where the future of multimodality is going from Google’s perspective.

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Kane and Dustin speak to author and researcher, Bob Moore, about his book Conversational UX Design and how to use conversation analysis techniques to create more natural conversational experiences. read more

The voice design sprint with Maaike Coppens

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Maaike Coppens returns to share how you can go from zero to hero in one voice design sprint. From nothing at the beginning to a a validated use case and prototype at the end, with fun in the middle.  read more

Building an assistant on an assistant with Nick Carey

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This week, Dustin Coates and Kane Simms are joined by Nick Carey of Potato to discuss the concept of creating an assistant on an assistant. read more

Anything world with Gordon Midwood

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This week, we’re getting deep into using voice to enhance the gaming experience, with Anything World founder, Gordon Midwood.  read more

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In this episode, we take a deep dive into the creation of the world’s first voice-first interactive documentary: Hidden Cities Berlin for Google Assistant. read more

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Learn the art of conversation design with Hans Van Dam

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VUI design best practice from user testing with 120 brands, with Abhishek Suthan and Dylan Zwick

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Pulse Labs founders, Abhishek Suthan and Dylan Zwick share their advice on VUI design best practice that they’ve learned from conducting voice first usability testing with over 120 brands.


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The search for VUI design best practice

In web design, there are standards. Common design patterns and best practice that you’ll find on most websites and apps.

The burger menu, call to action buttons, a search bar at the top of the page. These have all been tried and tested and are par for the course on most websites.

In voice, that best practice is still to be worked out. And today’s guests have begun to uncover it.

Pulse Labs is a voice first usability testing company. They conduct global remote user research by testing voice experiences for brands. Think of it almost like usertesting.com, but specifically for voice.

After working with over 120 brands, the founders; Abhishek Suthan and Dylan Zwick, have stumbled upon some of the most common mistakes that designers and developers make in their Google Assistant Actions and Alexa Skills.

Through design iterations and further testing, they’ve worked out what some of that best practice looks like.

In this episode

Over the course of this episode, we hear from Abhishek and Dylan about some of the most common mistakes designers make when it comes to voice user experience design.

We discuss how these issues can be fixed, as well as further best practice when designing for voice, including:

  • How to architect your voice app and design flat menus
  • How to handle errors and recover from failure
  • Framing experiences and handling expectations
  • When to apply confirmations and when to make assumptions
  • And a whole host more

This episode is one to listen to again and again. No doubt the standards will change as and when the tech advances and usage grows, but for now, this is probably the best start there is in defining best practice in voice.

Links

Visit the Pulse Labs website

Email Dylan Zwick

Follow Pulse Labs on Twitter

Follow Dylan on Twitter

Follow Pulse Labs on Facebook

Follow Pulse Labs on LinkedIn

Voice first design strategy with Ben Sauer

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Ben Sauer is a Design Strategist who’s worked with some of the world’s well known brands: Virgin, Tesco, Pearsons, British Gas, Penguin Random House, BBC. Ben worked with Clearleft as a Design Strategist for many years and more recently turned his attention to how voice will change design.

Over the last couple of years, Ben has been focusing on helping brands navigate the voice space and figure out how voice will impact their business, as well as where to start with a voice strategy.

Ben joins Dustin and I today to discuss the ins and outs of voice first design strategy, including finding a use case and the differences between voice design strategy and design strategy in general.

Where to listen

Links

Follow Ben Sauer on Twitter

Visit voiceprinciples.com

BenSauer.net